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Do I have to pay taxes on my social security benefits?

Q) Do I have to pay taxes on my social security benefits? A) According to the IRS: Social security benefits include monthly retirement, survivor, and disability benefits. They do not include supplemental security income (SSI) payments, which are not taxable. The amount of social security benefits that must be included on your income tax return and usedContinue Reading

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How do I know if I have to file quarterly individual estimated tax payments?

Q) How do I know if I have to file quarterly individual estimated tax payments? A) According to the IRS: You must make estimated tax payments for the current tax year if both of the following apply: You expect to owe at least $1,000 in tax for the current tax year, after subtracting your withholding and refundable credits. YouContinue Reading

What is a split refund?

Q) What is a split refund? A) The IRS allows your refund to be split. A split refund lets you divide your refund, in any proportion you want, and direct deposit the funds into up to three different accounts with U.S. financial institutions. To allocate a split refund. you should use Form 8888 (PDF), Allocation of Refund, to request to haveContinue Reading

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What happens if I file my IRS taxes late?

According to the IRS – April 15 is the annual deadline for most people to file their federal income tax return and pay any taxes they owe. By law, the IRS may assess penalties to taxpayers for both failing to file a tax return and for failing to pay taxes they owe by the deadline.Continue Reading

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How would I obtain a private letter ruling?

Q) How would I obtain a private letter ruling? A) According to the IRS: The procedures and user fees for obtaining a letter ruling are published annually in the first revenue procedure of each calendar year. The current procedures are in Revenue Procedure 2014-1 which can be found in Internal Revenue Bulletin 2014-1. The Revenue Procedure and the Internal RevenueContinue Reading

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Category Archives: Earned Income Tax Credit

I have seven Children can i claim them all on my taxes

Q) I have seven Children can i claim them all on my taxes

A) There is no maximum amount of dependents you’re allowed to claim on your tax return. You can claim all dependents who are qualified child dependents according to IRS rules. Consider it a token of appreciation for supporting the ever-increasing costs of diapers, astronomical college tuition fees and for simply putting food on the table each night.

What qualifies a child as my dependent?
You may see this question to have a simple answer if you are married parents filing a joint return. However, for single parents, married parents who file separately or other relatives, the answer is not as clear.

A qualifying child dependent has slightly different requirements than a qualifying relative dependent does. In order to be considered a qualifying child dependent, they must meet all of the following requirements:

The child must be a U.S. citizen, national, resident or a resident of Mexico or Canada.
The child cannot be claimed by someone else or themselves if they are also taking the personal exemption.
If the child is filing a tax return, they cannot be claiming a dependent.
The child cannot be filing a joint tax return.
The child must be your son, daughter, stepchild, brother, sister, eligible foster child, half sibling, stepsibling, or adopted child. He/she can also qualify if they are an offspring of any of the above.
The child must have lived with you for more than half of the year.
The child must be under 19 years old. If the child is a full-time student, they must be under 24 years old. There is no age limit if the child is totally and permanently disabled.
You must have provided more than half of the child’s annual financial support.
How much is each dependent child worth on my tax return?
Each child claimed as a dependent reduces your taxable income by $4,000. Contrary to popular belief, this does not mean that $4,000 will be added to your refund or directly deducted from your tax bill. It means that the income amount that you are being taxed on is reduced which ultimately reduces your tax bill (or increases your refund amount).

Although claiming a dependent or two on your tax return opens the door to qualifying for the Child Tax Credit, it does not guarantee it. https://www.rapidtax.com/blog/how-many-kids-can-you-claim-on-taxes/

118 Responses to Click to Tell Us Your Experience At Your Local Tax Office

  1. According to the IRS: You can fix mistakes or omissions on your tax return by filing an amended tax return. If you need to file one, these tips can help.

    Must be filed on paper. Use Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, to correct your tax return. It can’t be e-filed. You can get the form on IRS.gov/forms at any time. See the Form 1040X instructions for the address where you should mail your form.

    Amend to correct errors. File an amended tax return to correct errors or make changes to your original tax return. For example, you should amend to change your filing status, or to correct your income, deductions or credits.

    Don’t amend for math errors, missing forms. You normally don’t need to file an amended return to correct math errors on your original return. The IRS will automatically correct those for you. Also, do not file an amended return if you forgot to attach tax forms, such as a Form W-2 or a schedule. The IRS will mail you a request for them in most cases.

    Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, errors. Some taxpayers may receive a second Form 1095-A because the information on their initial form was incorrect or incomplete. If you filed a 2015 tax return based on the initial Form 1095-A and claimed the premium tax credit using incorrect information from either the federally-facilitated or a state-based Health Insurance Marketplace, you should determine the effect the changes to your form might have on your return. Comparing the two Forms 1095-A can help you assess whether you should file an amended tax return, Form 1040X.

    Three-year time limit. You usually have three years from the date you filed your original tax return to file Form 1040X to claim a refund. You can file it within two years from the date you paid the tax, if that date is later. That means the last day for most people to file a 2012 claim for a refund is April 18, 2016 (April 19 for taxpayers in Maine and Massachusetts). See the Form 1040X instructions for special rules that apply to some claims.

    Separate forms for each year. If you are amending more than one tax return, prepare a 1040X for each year. You should mail each year in separate envelopes. Note the tax year of the return you are amending at the top of Form 1040X. Check the form’s instructions for where to mail your return.

    Attach other forms with changes. If you use other IRS forms or schedules to make changes, make sure to attach them to your Form 1040X.

    When to file for corrected refund. If you are due a refund from your original return, wait to get it before filing Form 1040X to claim an additional refund. Amended returns take up to 16 weeks to process.

    Pay additional tax. If you owe more tax, file your Form 1040X and pay the tax as soon as you can to avoid possible penalties and interest from being added to your account. Use IRS Direct Pay to pay your tax directly from your checking or savings account. Source https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/amending-your-tax-return-ten-tips

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I am trying to figure out who has been claiming my child and getting eic for her

Q) I am trying to figure out who has been claiming my child and getting eic for her A) According to the IRS ..… suspect or know of an individual or a business that is not complying with the tax laws on issues such as: False Exemptions or DeductionsKickbacksFalse/Altered DocumentFailure to Pay TaxUnreported IncomeOrganized CrimeFailure to WithholdContinue Reading

 We bought our home in 2000 for $60,500. We sold it in July for $60,000. How do I put this on my income tax return for 2018?

Q) We bought our home in 2000 for $60,500. We sold it this last July for $60,000. How do I put this on my income tax return for 2018? A) Most people use the Schedule D form to report capital gains and losses that result from the sale or trade of certain property during the year. As ofContinue Reading

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My husband won 14,000.00 at casino..Can he claim all the losing lotto tickets … to wash out taxes?

Q) My husband won 14,000.00 at casino in Delaware we live in Md. Can he claim all the losing lotto tickets he has lost this year to wash out taxes owed for this 14,000.00 winning. Also what is the tax percentage to Maryland and Federal for tax withholding on this amount. A) According o TurboTax.comContinue Reading

Do we take the standard deduction for our house interest payments or do we take 20% of the actual tax amount paid

Q) We live in Grand junction Colorado and bought a house here. We have a mcc a mortgage credit certificate that says we can deduct 20% from our interest paid on our first mortgage. The interest paid is less than the standard deduction. Do we take the standard deduction or do we take 20% of theContinue Reading

How do I request a non-filing verification letter?

Q) How do I request a non-filing verification letter? A) An IRS Verification of Non-filing Letter – provides proof that the IRS has no record of a filed Form 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ for the year you requested. Non Tax filers can request an IRS Verification of Non-filing of their 2015 tax return status, free of charge,Continue Reading

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