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I never filed my 2015 taxes. How would I go about filing?

Q) I never filed my 2015 taxes as I did not have the money to pay to have them filed. I need to get that taken care of as soon as possible and have my 2015 taxes filed and was recommended to come into the IRS office and do that since it can’t be filed electronically now that is has been too long. How would I go about doing that, what information other than W2 would I need and how much does it cost? I have never prepared my own taxes before and do not quite understand how to do it by myself.

A) According to the IRS: File your past due return the same way and to the same location where you would file an on-time return.

If you have received a notice, make sure to send your past due return to the location indicated on the notice you received.

Why You Should File Your Past Due Return Now
Avoid interest and penalties

File your past due return and pay now to limit interest charges and late payment penalties.

Claim a Refund

You risk losing your refund if you don’t file your return. If you are due a refund for withholding or estimated taxes, you must file your return to claim it within 3 years of the return due date. The same rule applies to a right to claim tax credits such as the Earned Income Credit.

We hold income tax refunds in cases where our records show that one or more income tax returns are past due. We hold them until we get the past due return or receive an acceptable reason for not filing a past due return.

Protect Social Security Benefits

If you are self-employed and do not file your federal income tax return, any self-employment income you earned will not be reported to the Social Security Administration and you will not receive credits toward Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

Avoid Issues Obtaining Loans

Loan approvals may be delayed if you don’t file your return. Copies of filed tax returns must be submitted to financial institutions, mortgage lenders/brokers, etc., whenever you want to buy or refinance a home, get a loan for a business, or apply for federal aid for higher education.

If You Owe More Than You Can Pay
If you cannot pay what you owe, you can request an additional 60-120 days to pay your account in full through the Online Payment Agreement application or by calling 800-829-1040; no user fee will be charged. If you need more time to pay, you can request an installment agreement or you may qualify for an offer in compromise. https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/filing-past-due-tax-returns

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